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Milwaukee police beating victim arrested again; UW says erasing chancellors’ video was not mistake; 12 more Wisconsin news briefs

A man who received a $2 million settlement after he was kicked and beaten by Milwaukee police officers has been arrested again.

WITI TV reported Frank Jude of Wauwatosa is in jail for violating a previous probation after he was arrested Monday on Milwaukee's south side for possessing an illegal drug and resisting arrest. Charges are pending.

Jude was beaten in 2004 at a police officer's housewarming party after he was suspected of stealing the officer's badge.

Three officers who were off-duty at the time were sent to prison for violating Jude's civil rights.

Jude has since been arrested several times for domestic abuse. He's scheduled to go on trial May 23 on a charge of resisting arrest.

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UW says erasing chancellors’ video was not mistake

MADISON -- We'll never know exactly what University of Wisconsin chancellors were planning to tell the Board of Regents about the effects of the state budget cuts on their individual campuses.

University spokesman Alex Hummel told the Wisconsin State Journal he deleted a rehearsal video from the chancellors to create room for other video from the regents' meeting earlier this month.

On Monday the UW System said it did not have to keep the video, and Hummel did nothing wrong by deleting it. It showed chancellors rehearsing presentations they were planning to make to the UW's governing body before System President Ray Cross scrapped the rehearsal and the presentations, saying they were too unwieldy and the move could politically backfire.

The schools later put out one page statements of how the budget cuts have affected them.

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Trump, Clinton gain big wins; State Dems to choose delegates

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton scored big primary victories in their home state of New York, moving them much closer to their parties' presidential nominations.

Trump grabbed at least 84 of 95 possible delegates, while Clinton picked up almost 20 more delegates than Bernie Sanders.

Ted Cruz said the party should rally around him and there's no way the GOP can unite the country unless they can unite themselves.

Meanwhile, Wisconsin Democrats have released the names of 250 candidates for their convention delegates.

Assembly Democrat Cory Mason of Racine is among those hoping to represent Clinton when House district delegates are chosen May 1. Kelly Westlund, who ran for the northern Wisconsin House seat in 2014, is among the possible Sanders delegates.

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Walker in Eau Claire: Open convention likely

Gov. Scott Walker says he expects Republicans won't have a candidate by July.

The governor told a crowd in Eau Claire Monday that he expects an open Republican convention.

Walker said the trend is breaking in Ted Cruz's favor even as GOP frontrunner Donald Trump looked poised for a big win in New York.

Walker endorsed Cruz prior to the April 5 Wisconsin Primary, which Cruz won by capturing 48% of the vote to Trump's 35%.

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Senate votes to stop making EAA pay for air traffic control

WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Senate has voted to stop making the EAA pay for air traffic control services at its annual convention in Oshkosh.

Wisconsin Republican Ron Johnson added the provision to a funding package for the Federal Aviation Administration that passed the Senate 95-3 Tuesday.

About 10,000 planes visit the week long EAA Air Venture show each July.

The government never made the sponsoring group pay for traffic control until the federal budget cuts from three years ago. Since then, the EAA has paid almost $500,000 dollars per year after the federal agency rejected a special waiver of that fee.

EAA chairman Jack Pelton the fee has prevented his group from doing new things at the shows -- like expanding its Youth Flight Academy.

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Waupaca County panel rejects ban on buck hunting

A committee in one of Wisconsin's most popular deer hunting counties has rejected a proposal to let hunters shoot only does this fall.

The Waupaca County Deer Advisory Council considered a ban on buck hunting in both the bow and gun seasons to prevent the deer herd from growing to the point where it could hurt other wildlife.

But the council refused to approve the idea Tuesday night after hundreds of people showed up to oppose the plan.

One hunter called the idea “ludicrous,” saying he did not even see three does last year. Another promised to close his land to youth hunting if the buck ban goes through.

The state Natural Resources Board can still impose the idea when it meets in May.

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Authorities continue to investigate fatal fire

PEMBINE -- Authorities in northeast Wisconsin are still investigating a house fire that killed an elderly woman and her two dogs.

The fire was late Tuesday morning near Pembine in the Marinette County town of Beecher.

Sheriff's deputies say a passerby saw the fire and called for help. The woman's body was found after the flames were put out.

An autopsy was planned on the victim, whose name was not immediately released.

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Man with questionable state loans faces unrelated bank fraud case

MILWAUKEE -- A businessman linked to questionable state loans is now charged in an unrelated bank fraud case.

A federal grand jury handed down 13 criminal counts Tuesday against De Pere businessman Ronald Van Den Heuvel, his wife Kelly and Horicon Bank loan officer Paul Piikkila.

All three are due in federal court in Green Bay May 6 after the grand jury said Piikkila approved $1 million in loans to other parties, and the money was used to pay employees and other debts to Van Den Heuvel's businesses.

There were reports that he did not disclose his financial problems to the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation before he received $1.2 million in tax-funded loans. The agency and other creditors sued Van Den Heuvel and his Green Box firm, and the WEDC says it's trying to recover the money.

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Verdict possible today in first phase of murder trial

WISCONSIN RAPIDS -- A jury could decide as early as today (Wednesday) whether an 18-year-old man is guilty of reckless homicide in the shooting death of his ex-girlfriend's mother.

Miguel-Angel Oertel of Nekoosa told Wood County jurors Tuesday that 47-year-old Theresa Coates tried to grab his gun as he sought her help last August and as he pulled it back, the gun went off.

Oertel was shot in the jaw and said he meant to hurt only himself at the time.

His lawyer said the charge should be reduced to negligent homicide, which has a ten-year maximum prison sentence instead of the 60 years Oertel is currently facing.

Attorneys will make closing arguments today before the case goes to the jury. Because Oertel pleaded insanity, any guilty verdict will require a second trial to determine if he was sane during the incident.

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Walker signs six child protection bills

It will be much easier for prosecutors to obtain evidence in child pornography cases under one of six child protection bills signed into law Tuesday.

Gov. Scott Walker went to Green Bay, Hudson, Wausau and Waukesha to sign the measures.

One of them will let the state Department of Justice issue its own subpoenas to make Internet service providers supply the names of customers who log onto child porn websites.

The other new laws include an expansion of the legal definition of sex trafficking, making it a crime to repeatedly abuse the same child and the creation of more efficient practices for investigating abuse of kids with disabilities.

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Harley profits decline amid lower U.S. motorcycle sales

MILWAUKEE -- Harley Davidson reports lower profits than one year ago as fewer Americans buy Harley motorcycles.

The Milwaukee-based firm netted $250 million from January through March -- almost $20 million less than the same quarter of 2015.

Harley's worldwide motorcycle sales grew by 1.4% even though they were down slightly in the U.S. which is Harley's largest market. Stockholders made $1.27 per share, nine cents less than the previous year but more than what outside analysts projected.

Despite the profit decline, Harley's total revenues grew by $80 million to $1.75 billion for the quarter.

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Lincoln Hills problems extend to Milwaukee

Problems at the state-owned Lincoln Hills juvenile institution are reportedly putting a squeeze on Milwaukee County's juvenile detention center.

The Journal Sentinel has obtained an internal memo in which county human services director Hector Colon mentions youth overcrowding on at least 33 days since the start of the year with 12-hour shifts and no time off for the center's officers due to extreme staffing shortages.

The Milwaukee facility's problems come as the county looks for alternative locations to place troubled youths away from Lincoln Hills in northern Wisconsin. That institution is under both state and federal investigations for alleged inmate abuses, plus a federal probe into civil rights violations.

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OSHA seeks $143,000 in fines against sauerkraut maker

BEAR CREEK -- A large producer of sauerkraut faces up to $143,000 in federal fines.

GLK Foods of Bear Creek was cited by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration after a worker broke several bones falling 17 feet into an empty vat last October.

OSHA says employees were making adjustments to an overhead cabbage conveyor when the machinery suddenly started moving and pushed the injured worker into the empty sauerkraut vat.

GLK faces several safety violations plus willful safety rule violations for letting workers on an open scaffolding plank 14 feet above vats.

GLK has 15 days to pay the fine, challenge it or seek a lower penalty in a settlement conference.

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Sturgeon spawning underway in Wisconsin

One of the more unique rites of spring has begun in eastern Wisconsin: The annual sturgeon spawning season is underway.

The large, ancient fish make their way up the rivers that feed the Lake Winnebago system to spawn. It's a big draw for nature lovers who come to the Wolf, Fox and Embarrass rivers each year.

Department of Natural Resources biologists say the recent warm weather has drawn fish to the Wolf River where the water temperature jumped about 15 degrees in less than a week.

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