MILTON - Wisconsin Highway 59 near Milton isn't expected to reopen until some time tonight after a morning accident involving a tanker truck. Officials on the scene are allowing the overturned tanker filled with ethanol to drain out for safety reasons.

The tanker was carrying an estimated eight thousand gallons of ethanol and it's leaking out at about 10 gallons a minute. The ethanol is being contained in a nearby retention pond. Officials say there is no danger outside of a 500-foot radius from the truck. People evacuated from businesses and residences in the area have been allowed to return.

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Governor Scott Walker told a dairy industry group that he hoped the John Doe probe into his former Milwaukee County aides would end this week. An audience member asked the Republican governor about the John Doe, at a meeting today of the Dairy Business Association in Madison. Of the charges originally issued, the only case still unresolved is that of Tim Russell, a deputy chief-of-staff for Walker in the Milwaukee County Executive's office. He struck a plea deal with prosecutors, and he's expected to enter pleas on Thursday to charges that he embezzled $20,000 from a program that salutes veterans - plus campaign money for two Milwaukee County Board candidates. Walker told reporters after the dairy meeting that wasn't certain whether the John Doe probe would wrap up after Russell's plea hearing - but he said there seemed to be growing sentiment that the probe was coming to an end. Prosecutor Bruce Landgraf would not comment on that. Former Milwaukee County veterans' service commissioner Kevin Kavanaugh is scheduled to be sentenced December 7th for embezzling over $40,000 from the same veterans' program. Ex-Walker aides Kelly Rindfleisch and Darlene Wink were convicted of illegally campaigning on county time.

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The FBI asked for the public's help today in solving a string of robberies at financial institutions in southeast Wisconsin. Six credit unions and a bank were held up from October 18th through November 20th in Milwaukee, Racine, and Kenosha counties. Investigators have not been able to identify suspects, or come up with common descriptions from witnesses. There was only one robber in some instances - and more than one in others. The criminals wore masks in about half the hold-ups. Three of the robberies occurred in Kenosha. A Landmark Credit Union office in Racine was held up twice during that time period, while the others were hit once.

Fares at Wisconsin's largest airport are still cheaper than the national average. The U.S. Transportation Department says fares at Milwaukee's Mitchell International are $57-dollars less than the national norm of $385 for a domestic round trip. And Milwaukee is 65-dollars cheaper than flights at Chicago's O'Hare Airport. Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele jumped on that number, saying that passengers can save a lot of money on airfares and parking by flying through Mitchell instead of O'Hare. That's not a new theme by Milwaukee officials, who've been trying for years to get fliers to consider Mitchell as an alternative to landing in the Windy City. The DOT's fare numbers are from the second quarter of this year. They showed that Madison had the nation's seventh-highest average round-trip fares, at 473-dollars - almost $150-dollars more expensive than Milwaukee. Cincinnati had the nation's highest average fares for the second quarter, at $535-dollars.

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The Solidarity Singers remain solid - but State Capitol Police have given fewer tickets lately to that group and others who refuse to get permits for their protests. According to the Madison Capital Times, state officials and a protest group have slightly different numbers. But both say only 3-to-4 tickets have been issued in November. And around 100 tickets have been given since August 11th, when new Capitol Police Chief David Erwin started enforcing the state's permit requirements for Capitol events. The Solidarity Singers have held daily noon-time sing-alongs ever since the 2011 protests over the state law which virtually eliminated most public union bargaining. Officials say the gathering permits are needed to maintain order at the Capitol, while protestors accuse the Walker Administration of infringing on their free speech rights. The Solidarity Singers - who are mostly public workers - had dwindled to a few after Governor Scott Walker survived his recall election in June. But since the crackdown, the numbers have swelled again. More than 60 showed up to sing on Black Friday. The group held its 500th weekday sing-along in November. Meanwhile, the Capital Times says former Kenosha County prosecutor and state DOT attorney Robert Jambois has taken the side of the protestors. He has offered to take all of the Capitol tickets to trial, saying quote, "I happen to believe in the First Amendment."

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A U.S. senator says he might ask for an emergency presidential declaration, to keep commerce moving on the Mississippi River. Roy Blunt of Missouri says he'll evaluate the situation before making a move. On Friday, the Army Corps of Engineers reduced the water flows from a dam on the Missouri River in South Dakota - and that's reducing the amount of water going into an already-dry Mississippi. Levels are dropping - and they might get so low south of Saint Louis, that barge traffic could be halted by mid-December. Almost 80 federal lawmakers, three governors, and numerous waterway operators up-and-down the Mississippi have asked the Army Corps to restore the Missouri River to its previous flows.

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A man whose son was killed by Kenosha Police eight years ago is asking federal prosecutors to review the incident. Michael M. Bell told the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel he would give evidence to the U.S. Attorney's office today which proves that Kenosha officers were not justified in the force they used against his son. 21-year-old Michael E. Bell was not armed when officers shot him in the head in his driveway after a traffic stop. The victim's father received one-and-three-quarter million dollars in settling a federal lawsuit he filed which accused the officers of using excessive force and violating his son's civil rights. The officers were never disciplined or charged - something Bell's been trying to change. He has also used his settlement to buy billboards in communities where police officers have shot-and-killed suspects. And Bell has long called for an independent statewide commission to review all police shootings, and all deaths of suspects in custody. Investigations continue in Milwaukee, where robbery suspect Derek Williams died in police custody while gasping for help for almost eight minutes. Four Milwaukee officers have also been charged with illegally inspecting suspects' cavities to look for illegal drugs. And Bell told the Journal-Sentinel he hopes to have the U.S. attorney investigate what he calls a pattern of abuse by Kenosha officers. Kenosha's police chief, John Morrissey, has not commented.

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A former treasurer of a youth sports league in the Fox Valley is scheduled to go on trial February 21st, on a charge that he embezzled 20-thousand-dollars for a gambling addiction. But the attorney for 41-year-old Rodney Schreiber Junior of Neenah expects a plea bargain before then. Schreiber pleaded innocent yesterday in Outagamie County to a felony charge of theft from a business setting. Prosecutors said Schreiber used mostly casino ATM's to withdraw about $14,000 dollars from the league's account. He's also accused of buying a computer with league funds. If there's not a plea deal, the judge will consider pre-trial requests on February 12th. Schreiber is free on a signature bond. Authorities said he was the only person authorized to withdraw money from the sports league account - but officials now say several people have control over the funds.

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All but two of the 12 whooping cranes that left Wisconsin earlier this fall have arrived at their winter migration homes in Florida. Five cranes showed up at the Saint Mark's National Wildlife Refuge during the Thanksgiving weekend. Five others are at a second location in Hendry County Florida. This is the earliest that the cranes have arrived in Florida in the 12 years of the migration project, which is aimed at boosting the numbers of endangered whooping cranes in the Eastern U.S. The first group of six cranes left Green Lake County on September 28th and were guided by an ultra-light pilot. One of the birds died in northern Illinois after breaking her left femur. The second group left the Horicon National Wildlife Refuge in Dodge County in late October - and for the first time, adult cranes that previously made the trip guided the baby birds without the help of an aircraft. The sixth bird in that group remains at a refuge in Pulaski County Indiana. As a result of the migration effort, an estimated 115 cranes are in the wild throughout the eastern part of North America.

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So far at least, Powerball has not increased its record jackpot for tomorrow night. It's still at $425-million - but lottery officials expect it to rise amid a flurry of ticket sales. Wisconsin is among 42 states, Washington D.C., and the U.S. Virgin Islands that play Powerball. Chuck Strutt, who heads the Multi-State Lottery Association, believes there's a 60-percent that somebody will win the top prize tomorrow night. He says the jackpot has already defied long odds by rolling over 16 times since the last jackpot winner. The odds of winning the Powerball jackpot are 1-in-175-million. And Akron math professor Tim Norfolk says you're much more likely to be struck by lightning. Those odds are only about one-in-five-thousand.

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Meanwhile, a southern Wisconsin man has already won his big Powerball prize in time for the holidays. Roger Cobb of Darien cashed in a million-dollar ticket yesterday from the drawing on Saturday night. He matched all the number except the Powerball to win the game's second prize. After taxes, Cobb is getting a check for $672,000.

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It's the coldest morning of the season in much of southern Wisconsin. Temperatures are in the teens throughout the Badger State for the most part. But Burlington in Racine County had seven-above at seven o'clock. And Sparta in west central Wisconsin was the state's cold spot at plus-three. Winds were either light or non-existent, so it's not like there are any bone-rattling wind chills. The cold air moved in after yesterday's clouds headed east. But the National Weather Service said another cold front will bring a chance of more snow to northern Wisconsin through tonight. Highs statewide are expected to be in the 20's-and-30's between now and Thursday. But a warm-up is predicted for Friday, and the mercury could hit 50 by Saturday in some areas.

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Testimony begins today in the trial of a Milwaukee man accused of killing another man by stabbing him 55 times. 28-year-old Alexander Goodenough is charged with first-degree intentional homicide in the death of 57-year-old Kenneth Johnson. He was found dead July seventh at a rooming house the victim owned. According to police, Goodenough claimed at first that he had no idea what happened - but he admitted to the killing the next day. Prosecutors said Goodenough accidentally stabbed Johnson - and the victim responded by swinging his fists. Goodenough then said he stabbed Johnson repeatedly until he collapsed. Defense lawyer Kelli Thompson said the two men were good friends, and most of the victim's 55 stab wounds were minor cuts that Johnson got while Goodenough was trying to defend himself. She said her client was shocked that his friend had died, and he panicked and took 150-dollars from Johnson's room. Goodenough's trial is scheduled to last through the end of the week.

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Governor Scott Walker says he's against proposed delays in expanding Milwaukee's Zoo freeway interchange and Interstate 39-90 south of Madison. But he also downplayed the idea of raising the state's gasoline tax, or charging tolls on existing freeways. The state DOT's budget request called for a two-year delay to 2020 in completing an expansion of the Zoo Interchange, which is the state's busiest. And the agency said delays were possible in adding a third lane on the "I" from Madison to the Illinois border, unless new sources of revenue are found. A state commission is looking at the options. But the Republican Walker says there's not a big public appetite for a gas tax increase - and it would take too much time for the required federal approvals for toll roads. But Walker did express support for an idea he first floated a couple years ago - charging drivers to use faster express lanes on the Milwaukee freeways. The federal government could allow it when new lanes are built. Recently, incoming Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Burlington) called for tolls on the most popular expressways used by visitors - including Interstate-94 in his home county of Racine. The commission is also looking at making Wisconsin the first state to charge a fee according to how much people drive. But Vos says folks are not ready for that concept - and Walker did not mention it when he discussed the highway situation yesterday.

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A Fond du Lac man can escape prison for causing the death of his ex-girlfriend's 18-month-old daughter. 24-year-old Tyler Jackson was put on 10 years of probation yesterday, after he struck a plea that convicted him of a reduced charge of second-degree reckless homicide. Jackson first told authorities that two-year-old Chloe Gessner fell down a half-dozen stairs last December, while following him to his basement. Doctors at Milwaukee Children's Hospital said the girl suffered a severe brain hemorrhage, and she was medically brain dead. Jackson later admitted to police that he was playing an "airplane game" by holding the girl from one of her arms and legs - and she might have hit the back of her head on a love seat. A sheriff's detective told a judge yesterday that he was still skeptical about that story. The defense insisted it was nothing more than a tragic accident.

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Wisconsin is about to observe the 10th anniversary of one of the state government's most popular programs - the do-not-call list for telemarketers. Hundreds-of-thousands of Wisconsinites have enjoyed relative peace-and-quiet over the last decade. And Friday is the deadline to either sign up to get on the next quarterly no-call list, or renew your spot. People must re-register at least every two years, so telemarketers can be assured that the no-call list is accurate. Those who don't sign up by Friday will have to wait until to make the next quarterly list which comes out in April. Wisconsin's first no-call list was sent to telemarketers in January of 2003. Only land-lines could be registered at first, but lawmakers agreed to add cell phones a few years later. And while the law keeps most pitchmen at bay, it does not stop all solicitations. Political candidates can still call - and so can charities and companies that you've done business with before. Foreign scammers have become more of a problem in recent years. In the last legislative session, there was talk of doing away with Wisconsin's no-call list, and making everybody join a similar national list. But the idea never went anywhere. To get on the list, log onto NoCall.Wisconsin.gov, or call 1-866-9NO-CALL.

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A robbery suspect shot-and-killed by Milwaukee Police was a jail escapee from Washington County, who fled after being released for a dentist appointment. Authorities said 28-year-old Daniel Kleinmann of Germantown was supposed to be serving time for identity theft when he robbed a man Saturday afternoon on Milwaukee's south side. Witnesses told officer Shawn Pecoraro where to find Kleinmann. Police Chief Ed Flynn said the suspect's actions led the officer to believe that his life was in danger - and that's when he shot-and-killed the alleged robber. Flynn would not say why the officer felt threatened. The matter is under investigation. The 39-year-old Pecoraro, a 15-year Milwaukee Police veteran, is on administrative duty for now. Officials said Kleinmann knew the robbery victim - and he was expected to sell auto parts to the victim when he held him up. The victim told police that Kleinmann had a gun, but officers said they did not find a weapon on-or-near him. Washington County authorities said Kleinmann started serving an eight-month jail sentence on November 16th with work release privileges. He was allowed to go to the dentist on November 19th but never returned. A felony warrant had been issued for his arrest. Kleinmann is the 15th person killed by Milwaukee Police since 2007, and the 34th in the last decade.

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Two cousins have pleaded no contest to reduced charges in the shooting death of a 20-year-old man from Madison. John and Jimmie Leuaxay were among seven people charged in Dane County Circuit Court for the killing of Jonathan Wilson just over 13 months ago. Both are 19, and they struck plea deals which convicted them of second-degree reckless endangerment instead of first-degree intentional homicide. The deal calls for two-year prison terms for each defendant, plus four years of extended supervision. But the judge can order different terms at the sentencing, which is tentatively set for January 25th. According to court records, neither defendant was directly involved in Wilson's death - but they and several others had been looking for people who caused a related beating incident a short time before the shooting. Four other defendants are scheduled to stand trial next May, and another man is due to go on trial next June.

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The DNR is taking public comments on three businesses that want to join the state's Green Tier program. The metal recycling firm of Waukesha Iron-and-Metal has applied for the program, along with silica sand maker Unimin, and the Badger Mining Corporation. The Green Tier program offers more flexible state regulations for companies that are committed to protecting the environment. The DNR will take written comments on the three applications through December 19th. More information is available at the DNR's Web site, accessible at Wisconsin.gov.

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After almost two weeks of searching, rescuers in Alaska say they've given up looking for a northern Wisconsin survivalist who set out alone in the wilderness. 31-year-old Thomas Seibold of Three Lakes separated from his traveling companions in late September to spend time alone with nature. He planned to stay at a remote cabin through October, and then take a flight home to Wisconsin on November 15th which he never made. An air-and-ground search began after Seibold was supposed to contact somebody by November 11th, and didn't. The Alaska State Patrol said it spent 13 days looking for Seibold, who's an experienced outdoorsman and a teacher at the Talking Drum outdoor School. The search covered 35-hundred square miles. It ended during the weekend, when a final sortie was made in a steep mountain area of northwest Alaska.

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State Assembly Republican John Nygren of Marinette was named as a co-chairman of the Legislature's most powerful committee. He and Senate Republican Alberta Darling of River Hills will run the Joint Finance panel which will hold hearings on the next state budget, and then make changes for both houses to consider in the spring. Nygren replaces Racine County Republican Robin Vos, who was elected as the Assembly's new speaker. Darling will start her third year as a co-chair of the finance committee. Nygren is best known for proposing a bill two years ago that repealed higher coverage limits for auto insurance, and removed some consumer protections. Majority Republicans approved the measure, which undid changes made by former Governor Jim Doyle when his fellow Democrats ran the Legislature.

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A robbery suspect shot-and-killed by Milwaukee Police over the weekend was identified this afternoon as 28-year-old Daniel Kleinmann of Germantown. Police Chief Ed Flynn said the robbery victim called police on Saturday afternoon, and said he was held up at gunpoint. Several witnesses later directed officer Shawn Pecoraro toward the robber. And when the officer confronted Kleinmann, the chief said the suspect's actions led the officer to believe that his life was in danger - and he then shot-and-killed Kleinmann. The chief would not say what caused the officer to believe he was at risk. He said a gun has not been recovered. Pecoraro has been put on administrative duty while the matter is being investigated.

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Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker has started a statewide tour in Green Bay to gather ideas from the public about priorities for the next state budget and legislative agenda. The "Talk with Walker Tour" was announced earlier today. Walker will also make stops in Eau Claire, Wausau and the greater Milwaukee area. He says he wants to get Badger State residents involved in the process. He's already promised to focus on job creation, reforms for government and education and investment in Wisconsin's infrastructure.

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It's been 266 days since Milwaukee had a measurable snow fall and 246 days for Madison. Measurable snow fall is defined as one-tenth of an inch. Madison has gone longer without snow only eight times and this is the third-longest snow-free stretch for Wisconsin's biggest city. Light snow over the weekend ended similar stretches for Green Bay and Appleton. Parts of northwestern Wisconsin saw up to a foot of snow last week, with the snowfall continuing through the weekend. Even though temperatures are cold right now, a warm-up is on the way for the upcoming weekend. High temperatures could reach 50 by Saturday.

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The commissioner of Major League Baseball gave a speech on ethics today at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Bud Selig is the former owner of the Milwaukee Brewers and a 1956 graduate of the university. He has been the MLB Commissioner for 14 years. Selig has degrees in history and political science. He will speak at Grainger Hall as a part of the university business school's ethics week. His talk will be entitled, "Perspectives on Ethical Leadership - A View from the Commissioner."

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Wisconsin Democrats say it's hard to believe that Governor Scott Walker did not know there were illegal campaigning activities in his former Milwaukee County executive's office. Walker told the Associated Press today he did not know his staffers were campaigning on county time - even though a prosecutor unveiled e-mails last week showing that Walker's county and campaign offices worked together as operatives in his 2010 bid for governor. State Democratic Party chairman Mike Tate said it quote, "defies reasonable belief" that Walker didn't know he was surrounded by people committing "criminal acts" in his county executive's office. And if it is true, Tate said it quote, "raises serious questions about his management ability, including who he chooses to surround himself with." The prosecutor's evidence came out last week, when ex-Walker county aide Kelly Rindfleisch was sentenced to six months in jail and three years of probation for doing campaign work on county time. Today, the governor said things needed to be coordinated between his county and political staffs - because they often deal with the same questions. But Walker said he built a firewall to make sure no campaign work was done on county time - and if he knew about Rindfleisch's activity, he would have stopped it.

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Governor Walker says he would not sign a mining bill that he believes would hurt the environment. The Republican governor told the AP that last year's recall elections made it harder for a mining package to be approved. Lawmakers failed to compromise on a package that most Republicans said would create jobs - but Democrats said would have hurt the environment while reducing public input in the process. Walker said he would consider a bill that ends a 15-year moratorium on mines that produce acid pollution - but he doesn't want to hurt the state's agriculture and tourism. Also today, Walker said he would sign a bill that ends same-day voter registration - but he won't make it a priority to push for such a measure. Walker recently told GOP supporters in California that he thinks the elimination of same-day registration would take pressure off older poll workers. But critics accused the governor of trying to discourage voting by groups that normally vote for Democrats, like college students and the poor. The Republican said the issue is getting too much attention - and he's more focused on improving the economy as he develops his next budget proposal.

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Governor Scott Walker insists that he's not considering a run for the White House in 2016. The Republican Walker told the Associated Press today that he's focusing on his job as governor, and deciding what he should recommend for the next state budget. Walker is a close personal and political friend of Janesville's Paul Ryan, this year's GOP vice-presidential nominee who's being mentioned as a White House hopeful for 2016. Walker says he has talked to Ryan about pheasant hunting and going to church - but they have not talked about anything presidential - or advice Ryan might give Walker for a national campaign. Walker told the AP, quote, "I've worked far too hard to become the governor, and governor again, to worry about anything else after that." He was first elected as Wisconsin's governor in 2010, and he survived a recall election in June. Starting tomorrow, Walker plans to go around the state to get people's ideas for what should or should not be in the next state budget. His first stop is in Green Bay tomorrow, and he'll hold a similar session in La Crosse later in the week. Similar stops are being planned for Wausau, Eau Claire, and Milwaukee.

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Wisconsin hunters took 20 wolves during the gun-deer season that ended yesterday. The DNR said only two of the animals were trapped, and the rest were shot. Also, officials updated the total harvest late this morning. Ninety-eight wolves have been taken since the season began in mid-October - and only 16 more can be taken until the statewide quota is reached. Meanwhile, deer hunters have until late this afternoon to get their animals registered. The DNR will then announce a preliminary total for the nine-day gun season. Officials said a week ago that the harvest for the deer season's opening weekend was up 19-percent from the previous year.

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Wisconsin's first wolf hunt is getting closer to an early finish. The state DNR said 95 grey wolves were taken as of yesterday, out of a statewide quota of 116. Some experts were certain that Wisconsin would not reach its quota by the time the season was due to end in late February. DNR wildlife management director Tom Hauge said Wisconsin's wilderness is more accessible than the rugged land out West - and that's one reason for the faster-than-expected harvest. He said the agency will probably have to revisit its quota guidelines. The quota had been 201, but Chippewa Indians decided to keep 85 wolves to which they're entitled under centuries-old treaty rights. Trappers have taken about 60-percent of the available wolves, and gun hunters took the rest. Hauge says the DNR is generally pleased with the way the wolf hunt has gone. As of last week, five people were given wolf-related citations - two for using illegal bait and having loaded weapons in a vehicle, two for not taking trapper education courses, and one citation for having untagged traps.

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Four charities in Green Bay have finally received $1.7 million dollars from a couple who's been dead for 25 years. Angus and Norma Beaton left their savings for the four charities. But the donations were held up for years in case Norma lived longer, and she needed the money. That didn't happen, but the will stated that the charities still had to wait for the 25 years that were listed. Angus Beaton died in 1987 at age 79, and his wife died just nine weeks later at 81. The Salvation Army of Brown County was just given 685-thousand dollars left by the couple. The local Red Cross, YMCA, and Humane Society each got $342,000.