The interim chancellor at UW-Milwaukee has been given the job on a permanent basis.  

Mark Mone was named today to replace Mike Lovell, who left earlier this year to become the new president of Milwaukee's Marquette University.  The Board of Regents chose the 55-year-old Mone over two other finalists, and 38 applicants in all.  He served as a top aide to Lovell for two years at UWM as the designee for strategic planning.  Among other things, Mone developed the school's "Best Place to Work" initiative.  As chancellor, Mone said his goals are to elevate UWM's brand, image, and visibility of Wisconsin's second-largest public campus.

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A mega-merger and spin-off involving Milwaukee's Journal Communications is one step closer to becoming reality.  The Federal Communications Commission has approved a transfer of the Journal's radio-and-TV broadcast licenses to the E.W. Scripps Company of Cincinnati.  That's part of a move announced in late July to merge the two companies' broadcast and digital products under the Scripps banner.  Newspapers published by the two firms would be merged into a new firm called the Journal Media Group -- along with community publications, and related digital products.  That firm would be headquartered in Milwaukee. Journal and Scripps' shareholders must still approve the changes.  If that happens, they're expected to be finalized in the first half of next year.  The new Scripps company would have 34 TV stations and 34 radio stations, making it the nation's fifth-largest broadcast group.  Scripps would continue to run its current variety of digital and information services -- the best-known of which is the Scripps National Spelling Bee.  

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The Regal-Beloit Corporation has agreed to buy part of the Emerson Electric Company for one-point-four billion dollars, plus $40-million in assumed liabilities. Regal-Beloit is acquiring Emerson's power transmission business.  It makes drive components, gears, conveying components, bearings, couplings and other items for manufacturers.  Regal-Beloit CEO Mark Gliebe says the new acquisition will broaden his company's portfolio, diversify its market exposure, and strengthen what it calls its "global foot-print."  The Emerson division will become a part of Regal-Beloit's newly-defined power transmission group.  The deal is expected to be finalized in the first quarter of next year. Regal-Beloit is based in Beloit.  It makes electric motors, motion controls, and power generating products for manufacturers throughout the world.

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Racine Police have arrested a man suspected of causing a drunk driving death over the weekend.  A 33-year-old Racine man is jailed in a crash early Saturday that killed 43-year-old Lakethia Richardson of Racine.  Police said the man's vehicle struck the other one with such intensity, it flipped over.  Officials said the driver ran from the scene.  He was booked on three possible charges, including homicide by drunk driving.

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Police in Janesville were looking today for five people suspected of beating a man in a wheelchair and another man in a bar fight.  Officials said the two victims were followed outside of QT's Bar-and-Banquet early yesterday, and were beaten by five men ages 20-to-35.  Both victims had severe facial injuries -- including a broken nose and broken bones around an eye.  They were taken to a Janesville hospital for treatment.

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All players on the Wisconsin Dells junior hockey league team are home from the hospital, after being sickened by a carbon monoxide leak on Saturday.  The coach of the Dells Ducks said a player treated for oxygen therapy at a Milwaukee hospital has returned home.  Eighty-one players, coaches, and spectators for both teams reported a variety of conditions -- including nausea, dizziness, and headaches.  That's after they were exposed to a large volume of carbon monoxide at the Poppy Waterman Ice Rink in Lake Delton.  One player lost consciousness temporarily.  The leak was discovered during a game between Wisconsin Dells and Rochester of Minnesota.  Authorities said it was caused by carbon monoxide from an ice re-surfacing zamboni.  The two teams were supposed to play yesterday but didn't.  The arena will stay closed until the zamboni is fixed.  Michael Fatis, president of the Rochester Ice Hawks, says the incident should encourage Wisconsin to pass a regulation requiring carbon monoxide detectors at ice rinks -- just like Minnesota has.

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A 20-year-old Milwaukee woman was charged today with killing another woman in a feud over a man.  An arrest warrant was issued and a criminal complaint was filed against Tequila Cole, charging her with first-degree intentional homicide.  Police said she shot-and-killed 23-year-old Alonna Thomas last Tuesday.  Witnesses told police that Cole and Thomas planned to fight each other, because Cole's boyfriend was the father of Thomas' child.  Officials said the two women arrived at their fight scene, and they argued briefly when Cole pulled out a gun and shot Thomas.  Cole then got away in a vehicle.  Two 19-year-olds were charged today with felony counts of harboring Cole.  No court appearances were scheduled as of mid-day for Sabrina Lewis and Lakaithia Tinon.  

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A $50,000 cash bond has been ordered for a Milwaukee woman accused of strangling her sister.  Fifty-one year old Marcia Render appeared in a Sunday court session on felony charges of second-degree reckless homicide and strangulation-and-suffocation.  Render reportedly told police she was arguing with her 52-year-old sister Sheri Head last Tuesday, when she called 911 several times and pinned the victim down while waiting for officers to arrive. Render said her sister eventually passed out.  An autopsy showed that Head died from strangulation.  According to prosecutors, the two sisters were in Milwaukee tavern last Monday night when Head started whispering something to a man who was not her boyfriend.  Render got so upset about it, she left the tavern early and gathered her belongings -- as if she was planning to move out of Head's living unit.  Head returned, got angry, and started arguing with her sister.  Officials said Head could be heard yelling in the background in each of Render's eight 911 calls.  A preliminary hearing in Render's case is set for a week from tomorrow.

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A Dane County was sentenced this afternoon, after he was convicted of killing his autistic half-brother.  Thirty-year-old Jeffrey Vogelsberg was on trial in mid-September when he was taken to a hospital with a health issue.  He later struck a deal with prosecutors, in which he pleaded no contest to second-degree reckless homicide.  Charges of intentional homicide, hiding a corpse, and intimidating a witness were all dropped.  Vogelsberg was accused of beating 27-year-old Matthew Graville to death in 2012 at a rented home they shared in Mazomanie.  Vogelsberg's wife and his landlord were both convicted of helping him bury Graville in a wooded area.  The Vogelsberg sentencing is set for 1:30 this afternoon in Madison.  Prosecutors expect to ask the judge for a 12-year prison term, plus seven years of extended supervision.  The defense plans to seek an eight-year prison term.  

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Wisconsin drivers are among the worst in the nation in causing fatal crashes by breezing through red lights, not buckling up, and having invalid licenses. That's according to a recent study by Car Insurance Comparison.com.  The report says Wisconsin is the ninth worst among the 50 states in what the Web site calls "Failure to Obey."  Badger State drivers get the highest marks for "Careless Driving" -- which means having a relatively-low rate for deaths to pedestrians and bicyclists.  Wisconsin's the 42nd best in that department.  Much has been said about the state's problems with drunk driving.  However, the Car Insurance Comparison report said Wisconsin was only the 16th worst for its percentage of fatal crashes that involve alcohol.  Montana is worst in that category.  Overall, the survey says the Badger State has the 29th best drivers in the nation, slightly below average.  Neighboring Minnesota has the best.  Montana and South Carolina are tied for the worst.  

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You might want to add one more thing to your family gift list -- a flu shot.  State health officer Karen McKeown says it's still one of the best ways to protect you and your family, despite reports that a strain targeted in this year's vaccine is not a perfect match to what's out there.  State immunization program director Dan Hopfensperger says it's better to have some level of protection than none at all.  Officials say it's not too late to get vaccinated, even though Wisconsin has had 192 flu-related hospitalizations in an early start to this winter's flu season.  About two-thirds of the patients were 65-and-older.  It takes about a week for the flu vaccine to become effective, which gives you time to get vaccinated before the family gatherings begin.  Hopfensperger also says to wash your hands frequently when you're with the family -- and if you're sick, the best way to prevent giving the flu to others is to stay home.  

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Gift cards are popular presents for the holidays -- but state officials say they can pose problems for both givers and recipients.  Jarad Albrecht of the consumer protection bureau says to watch out for scams.  Over the past couple years, more folks are getting texts and social media messages which promise gift cards of up to a-thousand dollars by paying a shipping charge, or filling out an Internet survey.  Those surveys can either place malicious software on your machine, or send you to a Web site that demands your personal information. Albrecht also says those who buy gift cards in stores should make sure they're in the original packaging, to reduce the chances of buying a card that's been tampered with.  If you're buying unused second-hand cards, Albrecht says you should know and trust the seller -- or else you could get cards which are counterfeit or drained of their value.  For those receiving gift cards, Albrecht says to use them as soon as possible, so you don't get hit with fees later on.