An executive summary of last week’s jam-packed community-input meeting was expected to be presented to the school board Sept. 8, with an eye toward a final board decision on future secondary space needs “possibly in late 2015.”

Tom Van Pelt, one of four citizen members of the Hudson School District’s Community Engagement Process Stewards Team, emphasized that the window is still wide open for residents’ ideas, suggestions and opinions on 11 building options presented at the community meeting Sept. 2.

Citizens can offer their input through the school district website --http://www.hudson.k12.wi.us – where key information from the seven-month Community Engagement Process is also available, including resident feedback to date.

The Process Steward Team’s executive summary will be posted on the site soon as well, Van Pelt said in an interview after the community-input meeting, which drew 160 people to the Hudson High School auditorium.

The school board will also hold a Sept. 29 special listening session on the 11 options, most of which focus primarily on Hudson High School and middle school, after which the board will narrow the options list, Van Pelt said.

A community survey will then be conducted on the pared-down list before the board decides whether or not to forward a final choice to a referendum.

No listening-session time or location had been released by the school district as of this week’s Star-Observer press deadlines.

The Community Engagement Process was launched in February in the wake of a failed referendum on a proposed new high school in November.

Asked whether the Process Stewards Team viewed citizen input at the Sept. 2 workshop as representative of overall community sentiments, including those of November-referendum opponents, Van Pelt replied:

“I guess time will tell. I can tell you, though, there were certainly a lot of people there who were very well-prepared, who had reviewed the information online and who came in with a lot of specific questions on the 11 options.

“We were very pleased with the turnout, and there was a great deal of energy in the room -- it was exciting because the turnout was even better than we’d expected. So I’d have to say that we all felt really good about how the community-input process went.”

Van Pelt added that the ongoing online comment availability, the board’s Sept. 29 listening session, future board deliberations on the matter and the final-options follow-up survey will provide ample opportunity for all voices to be heard in advance of a final decision and any referendum.

“So if you couldn’t make it to the community workshop or if you have further ideas and suggestions … now’s the time to make them known,” Van Pelt said.

The final-options survey is not expected to be conducted until “toward the end of October,” but Van Pelt noted that both the school board and the Community Engagement Process team have steered clear of firm deadlines for any secondary-space decisions.

Said school board President Jamie Johnson in an April Star-Observer interview, for example:

“With this process, we aren’t limiting anybody to anything. There are no absolute deadlines. We’d rather get it done right rather than fast. The important thing is that we’re trying to find a genuine community consensus that we can move forward with.”

The other citizen members of Process Stewards Team members are Paul Bourget, Jill Burchill and Joel Skinner.

Five of the 11 options presented at last week’s community-input workshop call for construction of a new high school, including one option that is split into two related alternatives. (See Options 2 and 2a below.)

A new middle school would be built under three of the options; one option calls for a new elementary school; and three call for no new buildings.

Options listed

Solution #1: Construct a new grades 9-12 high school on a site to be determined, convert the existing high school into a grades 6-8 school with upgrades and renovations, and the current middle school remains a grades 6-8 school. Estimated cost: $140.2 -- $152.1 million.

Solution #2: Construct a new grades 10-12 high school on current middle school site with potential for using additional adjacent property, convert the existing high school into a grades 8-9 school with upgrades and renovations, and the current middle school would be converted to a grades 6-7 school. Estimated cost: $135.4 -- $146.7 million.

Solution #2a: Construct a new grades 10-12 high school on a site to be determined, convert the existing high school into a grades 8-9 school with upgrades and renovations, and the current middle school would be converted to a grades 6-7 school. Estimated cost: $136.8 -- $148.2 million.

Solution #3: Construct a new grades 10-12 high school on a site to be determined, convert the existing high school into a grades 6-9 school with upgrades and renovations, and the current middle school would be converted to a grades 6-9 school.  Estimated cost: $135.7 -- $147.1 million.

Solution #4: Construct a new grades 11-12 high school on a site to be determined, convert the existing high school into a grades 8-10 school with upgrades and renovations, and the current middle school would be converted to a grades 6-7 school. Estimated cost: $137.3 -- $148.8 million.

Solution #5: Construct a new grades 6-7 school on a site to be determined, convert the existing high school to a grades 10-12 high school with upgrades and renovations, and the current middle school would be converted to a grades 8-9 school. Estimated cost: $125.2 -- $135.9 million.

Solution #6: Construct a new middle school for grades 6-8 on a site to be determined, the existing high school would remain a grades 9-12 school with additions, upgrades and renovations, and the current middle school would remain a middle school for grades 6-8. Estimated cost: $136.4 -- $147.8 million.

Solution #7: Construct a new grades 8-9 school on a site to be determined, the existing high school would be converted to a grades 10-12 school with upgrades and renovations, and the current middle school would be converted to a grades 6-7 school. Estimated cost: $127.6 -- $138.4 million.

Solution #8: Construct a new K-5 elementary school for existing Hudson Prairie students on a site to be determined, the existing high school would remain a grades 9-12 school with additions, upgrades and renovations, and the middle school remain a grades 6-8 school expanded into Hudson Prairie Elementary. Estimated cost: $131.2 -- $142.7 million.

Solution #9: No new construction or sites. The existing high school would remain a grades 9-12 school with additions, upgrades and renovations, and the current middle school would remain a grades 6-8 school with additions and renovations. $110.4 – 119.9 million.

Solution #10: Hudson Prairie Elementary students would be relocated to the other existing elementary schools. The existing high school would remain a grades 9-12 school with additions, upgrades and renovations, and the current middle school would remain a grades 6-8 school expanded into Hudson Prairie Elementary. Estimated cost: $108.3 million -- $118.1 million.

Solution #11: Current elementary schools would become grades K-6 schools. The existing high school would remain a grades 9-12 school with additions, upgrades and renovations, and the current middle school would be converted to a grades 7-8 school. Estimated cost: $108 -- $117.3 million.