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Wisconsin roundup: State Supreme Court to decide lawsuit over lame-duck session; more state news stories

The Wisconsin Supreme Court will hear oral arguments next month on a challenge to laws passed during a lame-duck session of the Legislature.

Laws approved last December by Republicans restricted the powers of the incoming Democratic governor and attorney general. A Dane County judge struck down the laws in March, but that ruling was stayed while a state appeals court has been considering the issue this month.

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Foxconn denies reports CEO stepping down

Foxconn Technologies is denying reports the main architect of the company's deal for a plant in southeastern Wisconsin is stepping down.

Reuters says Terry Gou will leave his position in the coming months. Foxconn says Gou will withdraw from daily operations, but will "continue to provide strategic direction and guidance." The company says he will retain his title. President Trump has said his conversations with Gou earlier this year are the reason Foxconn is moving forward with plans to its new plant and 13,000 jobs near Mount Pleasant.

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Republicans warn of effect on taxes from Evers’ budget

Republican lawmakers warn that Gov. Tony Evers' budget will make a dent in the state's current surplus and won't replenish the rainy day fund.

Assembly Republicans said Evers' plan could affect the tax burden for individuals. The governor says education, road repairs and affordable health care have to be funded this way. At a Monday news conference, Assembly Republicans called the approach "irresponsible governing."

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Attorney general withdraws Wis. from EPA lawsuit

Attorney General Josh Kaul has withdrawn Wisconsin from a second multi-state lawsuit, this one challenging a federal rule on air pollutants.

The EPA found regulating the pollutants was reasonable because it wouldn't boost electricity costs too high. The motion was approved last week, just a few days after the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals approved a previous request to remove Wisconsin from another multi-state lawsuit challenging health care reforms.

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Former Speaker Ryan to join Notre Dame as professor, guest lecturer

Former House Speaker Paul Ryan has a new job — professor and guest lecturer in political science and economics at Notre Dame.

Ryan will assume that position this fall. The former Wisconsin congressman and current Janesville resident is expected to guest-lecture on the fundamental of American government, the current state of political polarization, and Catholicism and economics. Ryan's two brothers, Stan and Tobin, earned bachelor's degrees in economics from the school.

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Former governor uninvited to caucus after annoying Sensenbrenner

Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner says the caucus chair was the one who uninvited former Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker from a meeting, but he agrees.

The Republican Sensenbrenner was annoyed by Walker's comments about the president's emergency border declaration. Walker had said he was shocked that a North Carolina senator opposed the president's plan, but Sensenbrenner says he did, too. He said he didn't want to risk that Walker would criticize him at the March meeting.

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Lawmakers consider ‘newborn safety boxes’

The Wisconsin Senate is considering new legislation to provide additional resources for parents who want to safely surrender a newborn baby.

The state already has a "Safe Haven" law which allows an infant to be surrendered anonymously within 72 hours of its birth without risking criminal charges. State Sen. Dale Kooyenga is proposing baby boxes be placed around the state with heating, cooling and a silent alarm which lets emergency personnel know a baby is present. Three states already have such a program in place.