Deer in Wisconsin's Northwoods have suffered through a winter rated as "severe" on a scale set up by the Department of Natural Resources.

The Winter Severity Index was between 90-100, meaning it was a severe winter for the state's deer herd. That's the second-worst category. State scientists say a point is added every time the low temperature reaches zero or lower. Another point is added for every day the snow depth is 18 inches or more.

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Rogensack to lead State Supreme Court again

Her fellow justices have elected Wisconsin Supreme Court Chief Justice Patience Roggensack to the leadership position for a third, two-year term.

The choice was announced Tuesday, but the actual vote count was kept secret. Roggensack assumed the court leadership position in 2015 after voters approved a constitutional amendment which allowed justices to pick their leader. Before that, the chief justice had been the longest-serving member.

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Foxconn CEO - not Evers - headed for White House meeting

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers says he wasn't invited to attend a White House meeting involving the Foxconn Technology Group CEO.

Foxconn is still committed to building a $10 billion manufacturing plant in Racine County, promising 13,000 quality jobs. Foxconn acknowledged that its CEO Terry Gou would be involved in a meeting, but it declined to give details. Evers has said the Taiwan-based technology giant wants to renegotiate its contract with Wisconsin.

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Evers signs bill designating Michael G. Ellis Memorial Interchange in Neenah

Gov. Tony Evers signed a bill into law Wednesday designating the "Michael G. Ellis Memorial Interchange" in Winnebago County.

The interchange of I-41, U.S. Highway 610 and Highway 441 honors former Sen. Michael Ellis, who served in the Wisconsin Legislature over four decades. Ellis died unexpectedly last year but was able to see this project that he championed finished before his passing. Evers called Ellis a "fierce advocate" for his constituents during his 44 years in the legislature and says this commemoration honors his career of service to the state of Wisconsin.

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ACLU demands juveniles given life sentences have chance at parole

The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a federal lawsuit on behalf of five prisoners who were given life sentences when they were juveniles.

The ACLU wants a federal judge to ensure any prison given a life sentence as a juvenile has what it calls a "meaningful and realistic" chance at parole. One of the five, Thaddeus Karow, has been turned down for release six times. The suit filed Tuesday alleges state law doesn't establish standards for the parole commission to use when deciding whether a prisoner deserves to be released on parole.

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Baldwin announces $3M grant for Wis. Alzheimer’s research center

U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin says the National Institutes of Health is awarding a $3 million grant to the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Baldwin said, "this federal funding will enhance the work of the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center so they can continue their innovative research on preventative treatment options to help slow, and eventually stop, the progression of Alzheimer’s disease." She helped secure the investments as a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Baldwin says more than five-million Americans live with Alzheimer's and it places huge demands on caregivers and the health care system.

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Wis. forestry industry experiences growth

A study by the National Alliance of Forest Owners finds Wisconsin's forestry industry is very strong right now.

At 16.5 million acres, the Badger State tops the Midwest in the number of timberland acres. Nearly 175,000 people work in the industry and sales were valued at $21.6 billion in the most-recent accounting. The just-released report finds employment in Wisconsin's forestry sector increased by nearly five percent, with the value of the timber sold up by almost 10 percent.