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Wisconsin roundup: Republican leaders plan to kill governor’s signature proposals; more state news stories

Co-leaders on the Joint Finance Committee, Republicans Alberta Darling and John Nygren, speak to reporters in April during the panel's hearing in River Falls. Republican leaders on the panel said they will eliminate Democratic Gov. Tony Evers' signature proposals while reshaping the budget. Mike Longaecker / RiverTown Multimedia

Republican leaders of the budget-writing Joint Finance Committee say they will kill more than 70 policy items from the state spending plan in their first vote next week.

Signature proposals from Democratic Gov. Tony Evers like Medicaid expansion will be removed. Legalizing medical marijuana and installing an enrollment cap for private voucher schools are also dead. Republicans have been consistently against nearly all of the items their leaders say they will strike out of the documents May 9.

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High-income jobs, affordability drawing millennials to Madison

High-income jobs and an affordable cost-of-living are combining to draw large numbers of millennials to Madison.

The National Association of Realtors reports 75 percent of the people who moved to Wisconsin's Capitol city are members of that generation. A spokesperson for the group Destination Madison suggests the city's restaurants, music, parks and lakes are factors. There are negatives — the high demand and low supply of housing units are forcing prices for renters and buyers significantly higher.

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Study: Young Milwaukee-area black men more likely to get jail time

A study conducted by a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee finds young black men are more likely to get jail time than probation.

A criminal's age and race as a factor in sentencing was the focus of the study. Younger offenders were almost 20 percent less likely to be sentenced to probation for committing a crime. Professor Tiny Freiburger says Wisconsin isn't unique. She found almost the same tendencies when she conducted a similar study in Michigan.

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Rastafari cannabis sanctuary sues Madison, police

The city of Madison and its police department are accused of violating the First Amendment rights of a group calling itself Lion of Judah.

Members say the Religious Freedom Restoration Act makes it legal for members to use marijuana as part of a religious practice. The sanctuary has filed a federal lawsuit. The Madison city attorney's office says there is no documentation to support Lion of Judah's claim it is a church — and, even if it is a church, marijuana use is still illegal in Wisconsin.

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Milwaukee bars may stay open until 4 a.m. during convention

There will be a lot of paperwork needed to make it happen, but the first steps are being taken to allow Milwaukee bars to stay open until 4 a.m. during next year's Democratic National Convention.

Bars normally close at 2 a.m. The head of the Wisconsin Restaurant Association says the 50,000 convention visitors to the state's largest city will be working late into the night and they will want to go out and have dinner. Keeping the bars operating an extra two hours would require a change in state law.

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