Wisconsin's attorney general says tens of millions of dollars are at stake in lawsuit settlements held up now by a dispute between his office and state lawmakers.

Josh Kaul says if the stalemate continues the at-risk figure could grow to hundreds of millions of dollars. Kaul spoke about the situation at the Marquette University Law School Tuesday. A law passed during last December's lame-duck session requires the AG to get the approval for settlements from the Joint Finance Committee — but there is no process in place determining how that would work.



State Sen. Tiffany announces campaign for Congressman Duffy’s seat

State Sen. Tom Tiffany is the first official candidate for Congress in northern Wisconsin's Seventh District.

The Republican from Minocqua hopes win Congressman Sean Duffy's seat and is a strong supporter of President Donald Trump. Tiffany said in his campaign announcement, "I see the results of the Trump tax cuts. They have turbocharged Wisconsin's economy, because people are optimistic." Tiffany says he stands with President Trump and against what GOP candidates are calling the "socialist crew" of House Democrats. The primary and general elections for Duffy's seat have not yet been scheduled. Democratic state Rep. Nick Milroy of Douglas County and Sen. Janet Bewley of Bayfield County are also potential candidates.



Legislators introduce bill to create Wis. 9/11 memorial highway

State legislators introduced a bill Wednesday that would create the Wisconsin 9/11 Memorial Highway in Kewaskum.

Sen. Duey Stroebel and Rep. Timothy Ramthun were joined at the Capitol by family and friends of 9/11 New York City victim Andrea Lyn Haberman from Wisconsin. A stretch of Highway 28 between Interstate 41 and Highway 144 would be designated as the state's 9/11 Memorial Highway. The memorial will include a 2,000 pound beam salvaged from the north tower of the World Trade Center. Stroebel and Ramthun expect bipartisan support and are pushing for passage by this fall.



Lawmakers seek increase funding for UW MIA program

A group of senators wants to increase funding for a UW-System program that locates and identifies missing in action soldiers.

Sen. Mark Miller said "most of us recognize the significance of bringing back our missing members of the military." The bill would provide $180,000 a year to the Missing In Action Recovery and Identification Program (MIA-RIP). Sen. Dale Koyenga says Wisconsin will be the only state in that country that has a designated funding source and statutory language to help out the University of Wisconsin to support these efforts. There are still 1,500 MIA soldiers from Wisconsin.



Foxconn money for engineering, innovation research slow to arrive

More than a year after tech giant Foxconn promised to spend $100 million funding engineering and innovation research at the University of Wisconsin, educators are still waiting.

UW-Madison officials say they have received $700,000 so far, with the money funding one engineering project. A spokesperson for the university says there's been no progress in discussions about the money. Foxconn has started work on the construction of a flat-screen manufacturing plant in Racine County which promises thousands of jobs for the region.



Chippewa County manufacturer to spend $20M on expansion project

A Chippewa County manufacturing company is spending $20 million on an expansion project in Lake Hallie.

Huffcutt Concrete says the new facility will create 150 jobs over the next five years. The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation has linked more than a million dollars in income tax credits to the number of jobs which are actually created. The 77,000 square-foot plant will produce concrete wall panels in Lake Hallie.



Wis. suicide rate increases 40% from 2000-2017

Wisconsin needs an upgrade to its suicide prevention efforts.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services reports the state's suicide rate jumped by 40 percent between 2000 and 2017. Over the most recent four-year period people 45-54 years old were most likely to kill themselves, with 71 percent using a gun. Suicide was the second-leading cause of death among Wisconsin adolescents.